Tuesday, January 3, 2017

Jan 2017 30in30, Day 3

From Living Color by Natalie Goldberg, another passage, this one about a visit Goldberg took with her father to an art exhibit:

   When I returned to my father and came up behind him, he was leaning over an art book on his lap …  He turned the page and studied the next picture. It was a book of Joan Mitchell's pastels, wild scribbles of exciting energy. I had seen them before at the Whitney Museum in New York.
   I put my hand on my father's shoulder. He looked up. "Nat, is this painter here?"
   "You mean in the gallery? I don't think so. She lives in France."
   My father was disappointed. "Oh, I wanted to talk to her."
   "What about?"
   "I'd like to ask her what she thinks these pictures are. I mean, a horse? A tree? I can't find anything in them." (p. 142)

Natalie's father could be my husband! Or some of my friends! Or myself not so long ago!

But now? If there's a horse in one of my paintings, it's an interloper; I sure didn't paint it.

Today, a sketch by Carol Eden—who is venturing into abstract for the first time herself—informs my time in my studio as follows:

• I cut Day 2 in half from its 10x16" size, 

• take the bottom 8x10" half and sketch in a bunch of perpendicular and diagonal lines with a #2 mechanical pencil,

• add to my "scribbles of exciting energy" with an ink applicator bottle, superimposing ink on  graphite, 

• add a few blobs of India ink, and let them drip a bit.

Again, I am happy in my not knowing where this piece is going.

I like the lines—with their fine thinness, their angularity, and their imprecision. I like the blobs of black. I like the hint of a summer day, its warm air and outdoor vistas finding their way through the suggestion of a window screen.

January 2017 30in30 Challenge, Day 3
8x10"; acrylic, pencil, and ink on canvas paper
abstract
2017

work in progress



18 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Ophelia, thanks so much. But … stay tuned, and don't get too attached. Tomorrow I'll be cutting today in half (so to speak), taking one half, and seeing where I go with it : )

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    2. Ooooohhhhhh!!! I get it!!! I love, love, love it!!! I shall definitely check back!!! I just left a comment on your Day 4, and after reading this, it clicked 😀

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    3. Laughing! Fun, yes?! I woke in the night, remembering that I'd already cut day 4 in half, and wondering what on earth will emerge when I go to my studio today. No idea at the moment …

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  2. Love your taking an inspiration and running with it. The mind of an artist... always at work! See ya tomorrow Dotty :)

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    1. The mind of an artist IS always at work/play! With the 30in30 bedazzling me, I have plenty of sparks flying. For which I am most grateful.

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  3. Thanks for the mention! Love the way the lines play along with all the free spirited shapes.
    Wondering where this will take you!!!

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    1. Thank YOU, and you're welcome.

      This will take me somewhere other than where I was yesterday, that's all I know. And I'm happy to go there!

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  4. Oh Dotty, your comment on my blog made me laugh! And this piece immediately reminded me of a piece of music (?). Not sure why. Looking forward to seeing the resulting song!

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    1. That doctor dog at your blog was just barkin' at me to be playful—glad my comment made you laugh!

      Fun to hear that my piece above reminded you of a piece of music. Perhaps the lines hint at a score? In any case, I'm singing my way along to see what note this one will eventually strike.

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  5. Your quote made me smile, and remember my Mom. She never understood abstract painting, which is what I started out painting many years ago. She'd say, "but what is it suppose to be or mean?" When I'd reply "nothing. it's not suppose to mean or be anything," it would drive her nuts. She absolutely hated my work. heehee

    Found you through Sheila, btw. Can't wait to read more of your blog. :)

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    1. Katie, thanks for stopping by to comment. I'm delighted that the quotation from Goldberg made you smile and remember your mom. I never understood abstract painting either, until I did! In its own way, having others not understand and/or openly dislike abstract painting is a gift to me—nudges me, to my surprise, to dig deep and trust myself to paint what I need to paint, without self-judgment.

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    2. Katie, just tried to post a comment at your blog and ran into some kind of computer voodoo—"nonsecure form" and an endlessly spinning icon. So, for now, I'll use my own blog as a way to reach you. If you'd like to contact me at my gmail address, I could email you directly until I figure out blog stuff. UNTIL THEN, wanted to ask if you ever post work in progress. I was captivated in particular by the compelling layering and 'distressing' in your floral post on Jan 1—that piece presents magnificently as a whole composition AND it offers so much engaging exploration at the detail level. Totally love it.

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  6. Great!! I love cutting up old works and incorporating them into something new.

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  7. Sometimes we become too attached to our 'babies'. I like the concept of cutting a painting in half and creating new work on each half. A great way to free up your thinking for for it to be less precious. You have two good paitings as the result. Well done. Now to try it myself...

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    1. When I first started painting, I worked on canvas. At some point I started painting on paper, too, and I love being able to cut up my work! I love the 'accidental' compositions that I can find within a larger more intentional painting. For this challenge, I have chosen to do the following: paint two starts on 16x20" paper. Cut in half. Add to each half. Cut those in half. I will keep cutting and painting until I have 32 4x5" paintings!

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