Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Arthur's Weed Patch

I was living in the Netherlands when I first connected with Miss Peach comic strips. The reason I remember the character named Arthur and, more particularly, his weed patch* is that my youngest sister was born while we lived in the Netherlands and had hair that stood straight up from her head as an infant, hair that my parents referred to—with great affection—as Arthur's weed patch.

It was during those same two years of living in the Netherlands that a school friend and I, sixth graders at the time, spent a bunch of happy hours playing across the street from her house at a construction site after hours. As I've played with my current Core Values patch yesterday and today, memories have surfaced of the engaging pleasure of making something out of 'nothing' at that building site—arranging and rearranging cinder blocks, scraps of wood, bits of metal, and other stuff lying around in the gravel and weeds.

Here I am doing the same thing all these many years later.

added white shapes, scratched through layers
pasted tissue collage, extended color, added veiling
new patch, with final tweaks
detail
new patch in the bigger picture;
working title: core values


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* I kinda shrugged off my homework yesterday, not persisting in searching for online evidence of Arthur's weed patch, but look what my friend Carolyn found:

Miss Peach is a really sweet and kind teacher but, still, I hope she doesn't find out Carolyn did my homework for me.



15 comments:

  1. I don't usually like to make representations on an abstract piece , but sometimes it just pops out and you can't avoid it. Looking at the detail I clearly saw this embryonic form. Thanks for the comic, I think this strip came out when I already left the US.
    The whole is taking on shape!

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    1. Fun that you saw an embryonic form, Carol!

      The Miss Peach comic strip began running in early 1957.

      The whole IS taking on shape. I am starting to pay increased attention to it.

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  2. I love your little comic!
    One thing I love about abstract painting is that it takes us back to our childhood, when we were allowed to play and not take things too seriously yet!

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    1. Isn't the comic funny?!

      Yes, the gifts of abstract painting are many, and the connection to childhood playfulness is an especially wonderful gift.

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  3. your post today is brilliant...the combination of your words and your painting are the ultimate mixed media! I can feel the weight of the cinder blocks in my hands, a bit of gravel stuck in my shoe and the magic of building something amazing out of whatever is there. Now that I see the comic, I do remember it! And the NETHERLANDS??????? What a wonderful way to begin a life!

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    1. Thanks, Jen! Like you, I love the mixed media nature of a blog post about art where verbal and nonverbal create a little chemistry together.

      My dad was transferred to work overseas twice during my 'growing-up' years: to the Netherlands when I was in 5th and 6th grade, and to London at the beginning of my senior year in high school.

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    2. An incredible gift, living abroad! I am envious. My dad was transferred to....wait for it....Alabama. ha ha!

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    3. LOL re Alabama! For how long? How old were you?

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  4. I’ve loved this walk down memory lane to Arthur’s weed patch! I never knew about your playing in a construction site — your art really has brought you full circle. I see a fox lurking in your detail picture.

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    1. I was hoping you'd read these posts about Arthur's weed patch!

      LOVE that you see a fox in the detail pic—I now see it, too : )

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  5. I love this post, love the art, love reading everyone's observations.
    This first image made me think, subconsciously, of a nest. I see scribbles that could be a wing, and scratches that mimic tiny feathers. Some twigs, pieces and parts thrown together. Totally influenced no doubt by the doves in our backyard. what I love so much about this small square is how it is connected to more small squares. How each one has been a mini masterpiece. And how each one is better than the last. I don't know how you do it Dotty. But you do! Constantly improving. Very cool ;)

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    1. Dang spell check. I typed consistently. Or almost did. LOL :)

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    2. A nest! Wings, feathers, twigs! Fantastic!

      Sheila, thanks for seeing each patch as both a patch and a part of something bigger—your reflecting on that helps me as I paint. Thank you also for your kind encouraging words—an invaluable gift. I'll never know what (or if, for that matter) I'd be painting now had you not begun responding to my 30in30 posts in 2015; I only know how grateful I am for your being one of my primary teachers and cheerleaders. Huge, your impact.

      Spell check! I refer to it as auto-incorrect : )

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  6. Regarding Sheila’s observations of a nest, wings and feathers, I hope the fox I see lurking doesn’t go after them.

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