Saturday, October 22, 2016

MONOCHROME STRIPES, Day 6

What happens if I
• apply a ground color with a credit card instead of a brush?
• include some diagonal stripes?
• set a timer for 21 minutes of enhancing and then STOP?

My investigation with this piece included playing with the above to see what effect my choices would have on whether or not it would read first and foremost as monochrome stripes. I used varied length, width, and spatial orientation in the stripes; predominantly crisp edges, with a few soft blended ones as contrast; and a range of value, hue, and saturation. The angularity of my stripes gives a structural feel, and their arrangement creates depth—a feeling of foreground and several layers of background.

Monostripes #6 feels less monochromatic and less unified to me than other studies I did for this lesson, I think because of the high number of broken stripes, the combination of verticals, horizontals, and (dominating) diagonals, and the range of hues—I used more Burnt Sienna here than in other pieces. I garnered some instructive experience—as instructor Jane Davies put it, Often, less is more, but you have to go to the "more" to see What Happens If.

My favorite parts are the dry-painted area in the lower left corner and the two textured patches, one left center and one right center—they read as quiet resting places to me. I also like the many places with subtle tone-on-tone mark-making.

Monostripes #6

10 comments:

  1. I love how you're able to make things look so three dimensional!

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    1. *I* love that I did so completely by accident!

      Thanks for stopping by to comment.

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  2. Jack thinks it looks like stacks of wood, some with paint drippings on them.

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    1. Don't tell anyone else, but this really isn't a painting—it's a wooden quilt wall hanging made with pieces of scrap wood, some with paint drippings on them.

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  3. I see the black as stairs. Leading to more stairs. Diagonal support beams, and I am looking down from a bell tower. I am actually getting a little dizzy.
    Or maybe it is a clock tower. Wait, Orson is not standing behind me is he??

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    1. Oh my gosh—totally! Fascinating to me that I'd never be able to create these illusions intentionally, but there they are!

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    2. Sheila, I love your vivid imagination. What a storyteller!

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    3. LOL, thanks Joany :) There they are Dotty!

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  4. i really see this as monochromatic, altouvh c
    The diagonals are quite strong thsy help in pling it all together.Were these your limitations cor thelesson?

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    1. Limitations for the lesson: monochrome palette; stripes only.

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