Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Variety, B&W Day 6

A further key component of Lesson 4 involved a quadrant 'test'—i.e. isolate each quadrant of a given piece to see that it doesn't look just like any of the others; each should be reasonably distinct. You can look back at earlier posts to evaluate my quadrant variability yourself, but I've divided one of my studies into fourths and showcased it below. This quadrant differentiation test really woke up my visual attention and pushed me to add variety to my Lesson 4 studies. 


upper left

upper right

lower left

lower right




14 comments:

  1. These could be paintings in their oen right. Have been watching some of Jane's videos on you tube. Really getting excited!

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    1. I had the same thought, Carol, that each of these could be a painting in its own right (that I could then divide into quadrants to see how much variety exists!)—and, who knows?, when this class ends maybe I'll cut up the original! Don't you just love watching Jane's videos?

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  2. yes, and I hope she will push out of my comfort zone!

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    1. Jane has certainly got me doing stuff I'd never do on my own. Remind me, did you decide to take one of the downloadable classes vs. interactive?

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  3. Hi Dotty,
    I am in awe how much variations you are ablo to get into one painting ;-)!

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    1. Thanks, Simone! I'll tell you, I was tired at the end of Lesson 4—I worked hard. Learned a lot and had some fun along the way, too. In turn, I was awed by others in the class who followed the same directions and were more playful and/or minimalist.

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  4. Beautiful detail in each Dotty! Love them!

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    1. Thank you, Connie! I wake up in the night creating paintings in my dreams these days—the details follow me into sleep : )

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  5. Love them all Dotty! last two are my favorites, just love those bean and flower marks, and the endless patterns. LOVE your learning!

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    1. Thanks, Sheila. Fun to have you point out favorites and details. I am all about learning these days, that's for sure!

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  6. I am really like your black and white pieces. They are very creative. They feel spontaneous and adventurous.

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    1. Hey, Ann! Thanks for your feedback. I love black and white, but I have to say I felt totally saturated by the end of the week's lesson!

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  7. I am amazed at how three dimensional they look. You've got some serious skills working for you, Dotty!

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    1. Thanks, Joje. Isn't it fun to see that 3-D effect? That comes from layering, from painting and then painting on top of many times over, obscuring some parts, leaving some parts uncovered, veiling some parts, and so forth. SO hard for me in many instances to paint over something I LIKE AND WANT TO KEEP AS IS, THANK YOU VERY MUCH. But, with a boot in the pants, I paint over, and then I have the fun of creating depth and atmosphere!

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