Monday, April 18, 2016

Guest Artist, Caroline

The other amazing artist with whom I painted on Saturday was Caroline, age nine, a homeschooling student of life filled with curiosity, creativity, and a considerable collection of interests.

Clearly her Gma Dotty's granddaughter, Caroline is a voracious reader. She has recently begun making her way through Newbery Award winners one by one, and is concurrently reading three books among which she switches as the mood strikes her.

Not only is she reading many books but also she's writing five which she will eventually illustrate.

She has sewn by hand several dresses for her dolls and is partway through sewing a first dress for herself.

In the great outdoors she rollerskates, gardens, shoots archery, and rides bikes and horses.

Footwear of choice: barefoot.

Caroline recently studied under local artists Jan Lorette and Kathy Reiderman at a Girl Scouts meeting. She explored color mixing, perspective, and the need to look at what things really look like, not just what one thinks the color of something is.

When her Papawi commented over the weekend that he just doesn't "get" (or like!) abstract paintings (including his wife's!), Caroline shared nuggets from mentors Jan and Kathy, explaining earnestly that sometimes we paint what we see but sometimes we paint a mood. If a painting is dark purple, black, or gray it might be a sadder mood, and if a painting has colors in the rainbow and pink it might be a happier mood. 

As fellow artist and younger sister Emmy had, Caroline selected at random three provided pieces cut from a larger acrylic start (see below), and then she developed each to reflect her Saturday morning mood.

Leaving a Trail
Caroline
2.5x3.5", acrylic and ink on Sulphite drawing paper
abstract
2016
[not for sale]

Path to Success
Caroline
2.5x3.5", acrylic and ink on Sulphite drawing paper
abstract
2016
[not for sale]

Night Under the Stars
Caroline
2.5x3.5", acrylic and ink on Sulphite drawing paper
abstract
2016
[not for sale]

If you look at the underlying black white and gray in her pieces, you might be able to discern which sections of the original larger piece Caroline developed into fuller works of art.








6 comments:

  1. Your grandchildren are amazing! In the name of honesty however, I must say I agree with Papwi. I just don't get abstract paintings!

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    1. Thanks for your comments, Joje! I never gave abstract painting the time of day until recently, and I still don't care for many abstract paintings but others have become compelling, and the process of painting them has become a part of my creative experience that feels both necessary and nourishing—all very much to my surprise.

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  2. Hi Dotty!
    Your granddaughters are absolutely lucky to have a grandmother like you!

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    1. Thanks, Simone! I am beyond grateful to have those girls with whom to share love, laughter, and life!

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  3. What an amazing girl! WOW! A reader, a writer, an artist, and an athlete! Awesome! I love her explanation of abstracts. I will have to remember that. My mom does not appreciate them at all, but I think it is because she is trying to find something in them. A tree or a house, or something recognizable. Instead of just taking it in for what it is. I love Caroline's energetic work! Such fun! Night under the stars is my favorite I think. Thanks for sharing these with us!

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    1. Sheila, thanks for your thoughtful response. Caroline IS an amazing girl, if I do say so myself! My husband also tries to or wants to "find something" in abstracts; he wants a recognizable representation of an actual thing. I, on the other hand, have a deep need to tap into that which is wordless and measureless but no less real. Love that you enjoy the energy of Caroline's work. Night Under the Stars is a great little painting—I've just this morning finished mounting it on a greeting card.

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